Wood Burning Stoves

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Leicaman
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Re: Wood Burning Stoves

Post by Leicaman » Mon Jan 08, 2018 9:36 pm

Zasso Nouka wrote:This has already been posted but it's well worth reiterating. Grab yourself a pot of Rutland Creosote Remover or equivalent and use it once a week or less often if you don't use your stove every day. It turns the creosote that builds up in your chimney from an inflammable tar like substance into a dry crystalline powder that is non flammable and thus reducing the risk of a chimney fire considerably. It also makes cleaning the chimney a breeze as the dry powder comes off the inner chimney surface very easily when cleaning.

It is available Amazon at the moment and Komeri's online shop also stocks it. You can pick it up in Cainz Home for around 2,600円 and it goes for around 3,000円 in Joyful Honda. Most maki stove shops also stock it. A single pot should last you through the winter.

rutland.jpg
Thanks for the heads up. I’ll get myself a pot once I’ve picked up the stove. The ship coming into Tokyo was delayed a day or two which means we couldn’t pick it up during the holidays. I’m hoping it will be ready for collection this Friday. If so, I’ll be renting a truck and going down there early Friday. It’s a bit of a pain that the warehouse isn’t open on Saturdays.
I just noticed your post regarding free maki that you posted back around November time. Apologies for not noticing it any sooner. I popped into the mountains last weekend and got a car full (perhaps a little too full) of free maki which I’m hoping might be ok for next winter if I’m lucky.

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Zasso Nouka
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Re: Wood Burning Stoves

Post by Zasso Nouka » Wed Jan 10, 2018 6:26 am

Oh well, these things happen but at least it's not a long delay. Best of luck when you do go down to pick it up.

That's some nice maki you've got in the back of the car, should do very well next winter

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Re: Wood Burning Stoves

Post by gonbechan » Thu Jan 11, 2018 7:09 am

Leicaman, I love the doggy bowl and water bottle stashed in the little cubbyhole.

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Re: Wood Burning Stoves

Post by Leicaman » Mon Jan 15, 2018 9:26 am

Last Friday was the big day. With all the paperwork in hand, we drove down to Tokyo Port and went to the customs office. To cut a long story short, the whole process was much more simple than I had imagined. The customs officer was super nice and super helpful. She even worked out the duty so it would be cheaper than usual. As we had called ahead of time, they were expecting us and had the paperwork ready. We filled out a form on the PC (or should I say the customs officer did, and we told her the information) then we had to go to the warehouse where the stove was being stored. We gave the receptionist our documents and they said they would call us when they were ready. About 20 mins later, they called and told us to drive around the the loading bay. A forklift popped the pallet onto the back of our rental K-truck. We then had to drive to a different customs facility in order for them to x-ray the goods. We sat in a queue of trucks waiting their turn to go through a huge x-ray machine. It was quite humorous seeing our tiny k-truck sitting next to 30 tonne trucks. Half an out later and we had the x-ray rest results in our hands. With these results, we drove back to the original customs office and paid the duty which turned out to be ¥18,100. We paid no fees for inspections and only ¥1000 to the warehouse storage company for handling fees.
We arrived at the customs office at around 9:30am (due to bad traffic and a few wrong turns) and we were free to go home at 12:15 (perfect timing as they close for lunch at 12:15).
We drove back home and unloaded the truck. The stove is “only” 107kg but it is rather cumbersome and not the easiest for one person to move around. My wife had a good idea to use the motorbike ramps that the rental truck company had given us as a ramp into the living room via the patio window. It worked a treat and I could slide the stove right into the living room.
I inspected every piece of flue pipe and the stove, all of which were in perfect condition. The fitter is coming over on Jan 20th to fit it so we should be burning by next Saturday night.
A huge thanks to Phil for taking the time to write a very helpful post regarding the importing of the stove. It was invaluable.

@gonbechan good eyes. Mocha usually sits in the back of the car and her bowl goes with her but due to the maki taking up the whole back of the car, she had been upgraded to the co-pilot’s seat ;)

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Zasso Nouka
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Re: Wood Burning Stoves

Post by Zasso Nouka » Mon Jan 15, 2018 1:21 pm

Hey man that's really cool, I'm so glad it worked out well for you. We've always found the customs staff to be incredibly helpful at the Yokohama office. They honestly don't seem to mind giving you a hand when you aren't sure what to do and they really do try to make the process as painless as possible.

Bet you can't wait for the weekend and having the stove fitted and ready to go, should be a warm and toasty saturday evening. Welcome to the stove life :clap: :clap: :clap:

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Re: Wood Burning Stoves

Post by KumamotoHunter » Fri Jan 19, 2018 9:56 pm

Leicaman wrote:
Zasso Nouka wrote:This has already been posted but it's well worth reiterating. Grab yourself a pot of Rutland Creosote Remover or equivalent and use it once a week or less often if you don't use your stove every day. It turns the creosote that builds up in your chimney from an inflammable tar like substance into a dry crystalline powder that is non flammable and thus reducing the risk of a chimney fire considerably. It also makes cleaning the chimney a breeze as the dry powder comes off the inner chimney surface very easily when cleaning.

It is available Amazon at the moment and Komeri's online shop also stocks it. You can pick it up in Cainz Home for around 2,600円 and it goes for around 3,000円 in Joyful Honda. Most maki stove shops also stock it. A single pot should last you through the winter.

rutland.jpg
Thanks for the heads up. I’ll get myself a pot once I’ve picked up the stove. The ship coming into Tokyo was delayed a day or two which means we couldn’t pick it up during the holidays. I’m hoping it will be ready for collection this Friday. If so, I’ll be renting a truck and going down there early Friday. It’s a bit of a pain that the warehouse isn’t open on Saturdays.
I just noticed your post regarding free maki that you posted back around November time. Apologies for not noticing it any sooner. I popped into the mountains last weekend and got a car full (perhaps a little too full) of free maki which I’m hoping might be ok for next winter if I’m lucky.

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I hope you got permission to take that wood off the mountain. You can get in some serious trouble if not. I got permission from the logging company, and also from the landowner.

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Re: Wood Burning Stoves

Post by Leicaman » Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:21 pm

Don’t worry. I didn’t get it off the mountain. It’s from a construction company that must clear trees etc. They give it away for free so they are very popular with local maki Stove owners.

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Re: Wood Burning Stoves

Post by Leicaman » Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:43 pm

The fitters came round on Saturday and put the chimney up quick smart. They seemed to know what they were doing. The main fitter has 25 years of experience but they was just one thing that concerns me a little. When he put the insulated flue through the exterior wall, he cut a big square for the inner part of the wall, put some ceramic stone in the wall then inflammable insulation, but on the exterior part of the wall, he said it was inflammable and only cut a smaller a hole, a few cm larger than the flue pipe and put caramic rope between the flue and wall. The wall is what they call “siding” here in Japan. We asked him a few times if it was ok and he seemed convinced that it was perfectly safe. Just wondering what others think. I’ll attach a photo of the exterior.
Other than that, the stove is amazing. Really warm and mesmerising.

Here is a video of the stove when I turn the air vent to low.



And here are some photos

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Zasso Nouka
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Re: Wood Burning Stoves

Post by Zasso Nouka » Mon Jan 22, 2018 7:21 pm

I took the liberty of editing your post to drop the Youtube video in directly, it's the little circle with a triangle inside beside the Soundcloud icon if you want to add a video in the future. Hope you don't mind.

Looks really nice, love the effect when you turn the air down, the flames look almost ethereal. I predict many hours taken up staring at the flames in the Leicaman household over the next few weeks :lol:. We certainly have the perfect stove weather today. The door has a fantasticly large window, really shows the fire off well.

I reckon your installation should be fine, I take it your siding is concrete based or something similar ? A double wall chimney going through that should be no problem and the work they did on the internal wall sounds very similar to ours so you should be fine. The pedant in me though has to ask whether he used inflammable or nonflammable insulation, hopefully the later :D

How far is the stove from the wall ? If it's close it could be worth investing in one of these
shield.jpg
shield.jpg (16.76 KiB) Viewed 167 times
Larger Cainz Home stores have them or you can order direct from the maker Stove Shield

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Re: Wood Burning Stoves

Post by Leicaman » Mon Jan 22, 2018 8:14 pm

Zasso Nouka wrote:I took the liberty of editing your post to drop the Youtube video in directly, it's the little circle with a triangle inside beside the Soundcloud icon if you want to add a video in the future. Hope you don't mind.

Looks really nice, love the effect when you turn the air down, the flames look almost ethereal. I predict many hours taken up staring at the flames in the Leicaman household over the next few weeks :lol:. We certainly have the perfect stove weather today. The door has a fantasticly large window, really shows the fire off well.

I reckon your installation should be fine, I take it your siding is concrete based or something similar ? A double wall chimney going through that should be no problem and the work they did on the internal wall sounds very similar to ours so you should be fine. The pedant in me though has to ask whether he used inflammable or nonflammable insulation, hopefully the later :D

How far is the stove from the wall ? If it's close it could be worth investing in one of these

shield.jpg

Larger Cainz Home stores have them or you can order direct from the maker Stove Shield

Thanks for the ever helpful responses. Nonflammable, right you are ;)

Thanks for embedding of the video. I wasn’t sure how to do it but was pleasantly surprised when it suddenly appeared.

Regarding the interior wall, it 20cm from the back of the stove. The manufacturer recommends a minimum of 15cm for any flammable materials so it should be fine. With the stove roaring away all night, the back wall just feels a tiny bit warm. It amazes me how it can be roasting in front of the glass door, yet almost nothing behind the stove. Those engineers are pretty clever lads and lasses.

The snow certainly timed itself very well. I’ll be throwing a few more logs on the fire tonight to keep toasty.

Just a quick question if you don’t mind. I’ve read that I shouldn’t overfire a Stove. What kind of temp should I be running and where should I be measuring the temp? Through the glass? The top plate of the stove?
Cheers