Wood Burning Stoves

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Tora
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Post by Tora »

Is there a good timing to split camphor (クスノキ) logs? Does dryer wood slit easier in this case? I inherited a good stock but I’m finding out that it’s the gift that keeps on giving- headaches and stress trying to split it with an axe....

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Post by Zasso Nouka »

Personally I prefer to split with a maul when the wood is still fresh as it seems somewhat easier but have never split camphor so it might be different.

Are you using a splitting maul or regular axe ?

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Post by Tora »

I’m using a Husqvarna splitting axe and a wedge and 5.5kg sledgehammer on the tough stuff. Been meaning to get a maul but always seem to have something else to do so splitting wood gets put off. Now I want to get it done and the wood off the ground before it gets hot and rainy!

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Post by Zasso Nouka »

Those Husqvarna splitting axes are really mauls in all but name. I went with a really cheap X27 from Fiskars as I'm a skinflint :D

I've not done any empirical tests but it just feels that fresh wood is easier to split, maybe it becomes harder as it dries out, however the internet seems split on the question. Maybe it boils down to different species behaving differently when chopping ?

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Post by Nuff »

I'm looking at buying a house which has a maki stove with double wall stove pipe. The pipe is going through a room on 2nd level. How much heat can I expect the stove pipe to give off? Is it enough to heat up the room upstairs? Or it's not something that I should be counting on to keep the room warm throughout the winter.

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Post by Zasso Nouka »

It's somewhat tricky to say but from my own experience the double walled chimneys don't give off a load of heat, if you want to get more heat it might be worth replacing that run with single walled chimney and then continuing with double walled after.

If you want to keep the second floor room warm through the winter then replace with a single walled chimney, that can get really hot (far hotter than you could comfortably put a hand on) but you may need to consult a builder to make sure everything is safe.

We have a section of single walled chimney coming out of our stove and that gets really hot, then it transfers to double wall which remains comfortable to touch even when everything else is too hot to touch.

Hope that helps.

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Post by Tora »

Zasso Nouka wrote:
Thu Mar 04, 2021 7:15 am
Those Husqvarna splitting axes are really mauls in all but name. I went with a really cheap X27 from Fiskars as I'm a skinflint :D

I've not done any empirical tests but it just feels that fresh wood is easier to split, maybe it becomes harder as it dries out, however the internet seems split on the question. Maybe it boils down to different species behaving differently when chopping ?
I think the axe I got was similarly priced the the Fiskars when I got it. The Fiskars seems well loved by many. I was thinking about getting the Fiskars Isocore maul but things got busy and the price went up ¥2-3,000 so I guess that makes me cheap too?

The internet does seem divided on when to split different species of wood. I seem to either have the bouncy kind, the sticky grabby kind, or the knotty kind!

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Post by Zasso Nouka »

Tora wrote:
Thu Mar 04, 2021 9:46 pm
I think the axe I got was similarly priced the the Fiskars when I got it. The Fiskars seems well loved by many. I was thinking about getting the Fiskars Isocore maul but things got busy and the price went up ¥2-3,000 so I guess that makes me cheap too?
Sounds like you got a bargain on the Husqvarna if it was similarly priced to a Fiskars, I'd always thought they were at the cheaper end of the scale.
Tora wrote:
Thu Mar 04, 2021 9:46 pm
The internet does seem divided on when to split different species of wood. I seem to either have the bouncy kind, the sticky grabby kind, or the knotty kind!
We've got some reddish hardwood, don't know what species it is but our maul just bounces off it without even denting it. It burns really well once you manage to get it into smaller pieces but it's not easy even with the splitter.

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Post by edmundedgar »

Nuff wrote:
Thu Mar 04, 2021 4:59 pm
I'm looking at buying a house which has a maki stove with double wall stove pipe. The pipe is going through a room on 2nd level. How much heat can I expect the stove pipe to give off? Is it enough to heat up the room upstairs? Or it's not something that I should be counting on to keep the room warm throughout the winter.
We have a double-walled pipe upstairs, it gets hot, not too hot to touch but still pretty hot.

We find the heat from the wood stove goes straight upstairs. OK, that's mainly because we knocked out the floor above it and have a just single ceiling fan haplessly attempting to push the hot air back down:
Image

However I get the same with a gas stove in the room under the bedroom: The bedroom gets hotter than the room with the gas stove in it.

I guess it may be different for you if you haven't got insulation in your roof, but I'd definitely wait to try it before messing with it, if the previous occupants can't tell you.

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Post by Nuff »

edmundedgar wrote:
Fri Mar 05, 2021 5:53 pm
We have a double-walled pipe upstairs, it gets hot, not too hot to touch but still pretty hot.
Thanks! The setup is very different since it goes through the floor, but knowing that it does get hot, it sounds promising and yes, I'm trying to get more information about insulation of that house too.