Seeding time

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starting_the_dream
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Re: Seeding time

Post by starting_the_dream »

Zasso Nouka wrote:
Fri Mar 13, 2020 5:48 am
Judging by the weather we've had the last few days I don't think you'll have to worry about getting any more hard frosts.
I thought so, too! But Friday night it got down to -2C. Of course the forecast only said 1C, so I thought I was OK. Nope. This week also looks like we'll have some more colder nights, but from GW on it's supposed to really warm up for us. So I have a general question about frost damage. My eggplants are all wilted, but I have some younger leaves at the bottom that are still green. My long beans were just starting to sprout and unfurl, but now look brown at the top. As experienced farmers, do you take the 'wait-and-see' approach before deciding to replant, or do you typically cut your loses and replant as soon as possible?

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Zasso Nouka
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Re: Seeding time

Post by Zasso Nouka »

Well my mum back in the UK always said don't count the frost out till the end of May but that might not apply here in Japan. We've still got protective covers on vulnerable crops and haven't planted our nasu out yet, however that's more to do with slackness than being able to accurately predict the weather :oops:

If it's just the tips that have been burned then I'd be inclined to wait and see how things pan out over the next week or two but I'd also be looking how many seeds were left in the pack and perhaps thinking of sowing a few more just in case it all went Pete Tong. Something else that is worth taking into consideration is how fast growing a particular vegetable is, if it's quick like pole or bush beans then that would sway me more in favour of reseeding and starting over again or if it's more slow growing like nasu or paprika that would lean me more towards seeing if the plant can recover with a little protection. If you aren't growing commercially then any losses could always be replaced from your local home centre but if you are growing commercially it always pays to have a backup crop on standby that can be ditched if not needed or planted out if the main crop fails for some reason, after all seeds are cheap.

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Re: Seeding time

Post by farmingnoob »

Well I'm still having trouble with my snap peas. I sowed new seeds about 6 weeks ago. Everything was going fine until I noticed two were starting to turn yellow like last year. I pulled them up and they had no roots. I'm guessing this is root rot.

Does anyone have any advice for the future? Should I not water peas and just let the rain take care of it?

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Re: Seeding time

Post by gonbechan »

It could also be nekirimushi.. the english of which escapes me.
@Zasso Nouka should be along to tell you whether i am wrong or if you need beneficial nematodes.

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Zasso Nouka
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Re: Seeding time

Post by Zasso Nouka »

Nekirimushi are cutworms, they are a type of caterpillar that lives in the soil instead of on plants and are susceptible to BT like most other caterpillars. Normally they will bite off plants at soil level rather than eating roots so if you see a plant suddenly keel over and then lift it to find it has been separated from it's roots that's nekirimushi.

As for peas loosing their roots that's something we also suffer from and to be honest I'm not 100% sure what causes it so now we seed a good 50% extra plants to cover any losses. There's probably some pest or pathogen at work there. I'd suggest having a dig around in the soil to see if you can identify anything eating the roots and maybe watering less often to keep the soil somewhat on the dry side so no fungus can establish itself.

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Re: Seeding time

Post by farmingnoob »

Getting cut off at soil level... Yes that describes the situation well.

What can I do about them? What is BT?

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Zasso Nouka
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Re: Seeding time

Post by Zasso Nouka »

Bacillus Thuringiensis is a soil dwelling bacteria that for some reason is poisonous to caterpillars. You can buy the bacteria from SDS Bio you can order the 100g packs from IHS or many other online stores. If stored in the fridge with some packs of silica gel (Daiso sell small packs) then it can last for around 4 years. I'd suggest dividing it down into 20g or 25g packs and storing with a single sachet of silica gel.

To be honest nekirimushi/cutworms are pretty hard to defend against without getting into toxic pesticides. If using BT then you have to coat the entirety of the plant so that when they come along they consume enough BT to kill them. I've seen online if you make a mix of rice bran molasses and BT that can kill them but have never tried it myself. If you dig around in the surface of the soil near a newly killed plant you can sometimes find the culprit living in the soil and squish them.

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Zasso Nouka
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Re: Seeding time

Post by Zasso Nouka »

Time to start seeding Moschata pumpkins and zucchini. C Moschata varieties are more tolerant of the hot humid conditions we get here during the summer as they are better able to deal with powdery mildew and other fungal attacks, so time to start seeding your Butternuts and Tromboncino zucchini.

Tromboncino zucchini benefit from growing over frames so they are straight rather than curled up but although you can grow Butternuts over a frame a single typhoon will likely rip it down and fling it all over the place ending your Butternuts. When growing Butternuts on the ground use melon mats (メロンマト) and place under the fruit to keep them off the ground.

It's also a good time to seed Cowpeas now as they really love the hot weather and are pretty easy to grow. Kairan will also do well through the hot summer and produce loads of tender stalks.

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Re: Seeding time

Post by starting_the_dream »

My eggplants are all wilted, but I have some younger leaves at the bottom that are still green. My long beans were just starting to sprout and unfurl, but now look brown at the top.
An update: The four eggplants I planted have all come back. They looked pretty tough for ten days or so after the frost, but all four have new growth sprouting from the bottom. The beans didn't make it. After the leaves browned up and wilted, the stalks also died. I had two tomato plants that lost most above ground foliage, but they have come back as well. Other plants (edamame, gobo, carrots, okra and corn) had sporadic sprouting. I'd estimate 20%. So during GW I reseeded those vegetables and I'm already starting to see new sprouts. I chalk it up to over-zealous excitement in year two of gardening! And I've learned that buying seedlings doesn't make much economic sense. Since I have the space and am only growing a home garden, seed packets will work just fine. Lessons learned for the future. Thanks for the advice Zasso Nouka!

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Re: Seeding time

Post by Zasso Nouka »

Glad to hear they made a recovery, members of the nightshade family (nasu, tomato and paprika) are surprisingly resilient and so long as the roots are still alive they can often seemingly come back from the dead. If you can find a taneyasan that sells seedlings they can often be a lot cheaper than home centres, sometimes in the 20 - 30 円 range.

A couple more things that can still be seeded in time for summer, Okahijiki, Okra and most taneyasan's are getting in stocks of sweet potato slips if you want to have a go growing them.