First daikon harvest- no dig

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Mister G
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First daikon harvest- no dig

Post by Mister G »

Here is a picture of a daikon I just harvested yesterday out of my no-dig bed on its first year.
WhatsApp Image 2020-12-13 at 5.0.jpg
WhatsApp Image 2020-12-13 at 5.0.jpg (96.61 KiB) Viewed 210 times
As you can see, the end of the roots are forked. This is probably due to the difference in quality between the two soil layers. The plant is very happy to grow in compost rich soil at the top. Until it reaches a point where suddenly everything is different and the roots panic in search of familiar environment i,e, compost, thus explaining the forking. Definitely not due to stones or rocks in the soil. You can see the difference in colour of the soil before and after the roots seperate.

I personally do not really care for now as I am growing for myself, but someone who is selling produce might have to think twice about using no-dig for root vegetables.

Mister G
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First daikon harvest- no dig

Post by Mister G »

On side note, the daikon might look small but actually the leaves are huge! This is probably either an advantage or disadvantage depending on the vegetable you are growing. I never add fertiliser during the growing season, the vegetables are practically growing in almost unlimited nutrients.

Advantages of no-dig:
1) No need to dig, thus saving time and effort (duh!)
2) VERY little amount of weeding needed. I probably removed around 15 or so weeds throughout the entire growing season. Most weed seeds never ghet the chance to germinate under such thick amount of compost.
3) Compost is an organic mulch, thus no need to waste money buying those black plastic mulch. Prevents disease and holds moisture very well.
4) No need to add fertilisers. For many vegetables, it is just planting and waiting.

Disadvantages of no-dig:
1) Takes time for soil organism to establish. From what I have read, it take a minimum of 3-7 years to properly integrate those compost that you pile on top. If you have no patience, or need to get results immediately, then perhaps tilling it once will be better.
2) I get almost no pest expect for aphids, which are very happily sucking from new shoots and leaves growing in nitrogen-rich soil. Even now in winter, some are surviving on my daikon leaves. Be prepared.
3) Trying to reason with ojichan and obachan that no dig will not work :doh:

Looking forward to showing the next harvest of daikon and hakusai!

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Zasso Nouka
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First daikon harvest- no dig

Post by Zasso Nouka »

That's a lovely daikon, don't worry you get the occasional odd shaped ones even in tilled beds but they just never make it to the shops

Mister G
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First daikon harvest- no dig

Post by Mister G »

Zasso Nouka wrote:
Mon Dec 14, 2020 7:39 am
That's a lovely daikon, don't worry you get the occasional odd shaped ones even in tilled beds but they just never make it to the shops
That's really nice of you. I showed it to my aunt who has lots of growing experience and she was saying that perhaps my soil is not suitable for growing daikon :?

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Zasso Nouka
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First daikon harvest- no dig

Post by Zasso Nouka »

It doesn't affect the flavour and unless every single daikon looks like that I wouldn't worry too much.

My neighbours who relentlessly till their soil have a large pile of misshapen daikon left at the side of their fields after harvest.

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gonbechan
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First daikon harvest- no dig

Post by gonbechan »

Japan is way too obsessed with good looking produce over deliciousness.

I think this is why there is only one type of cucumber, basically 2 types of potatoes etc. Makes for a more uniform look on the shelves.

Give me a gorgeously bumpy beefsteak type tomato any day.

Also Charles Dowding is my secret crush.. garden wise.

Mister G
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First daikon harvest- no dig

Post by Mister G »

Zasso Nouka wrote:
Tue Dec 15, 2020 12:28 pm
It doesn't affect the flavour and unless every single daikon looks like that I wouldn't worry too much.

My neighbours who relentlessly till their soil have a large pile of misshapen daikon left at the side of their fields after harvest.
I'll harvest the second daikon this weekend and see. Good to know that tilling does not guarantee straight daikons.

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First daikon harvest- no dig

Post by Mister G »

My next harvest of Daikons were perfectly straight, so I'd say it's a success!

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First daikon harvest- no dig

Post by gonbechan »

Mister G wrote:
Mon Dec 28, 2020 10:06 pm
My next harvest of Daikons were perfectly straight, so I'd say it's a success!
Had to laugh... straight daikon after a bunch of bent ones HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA