Hatake/garden planning

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donguri
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Hatake/garden planning

Post by donguri »

What method do you use for planning your Hatake space?
How strictly do you follow your plan?
How far in advance do you plan?
How much thought do you put into the particulars of rotation?

I’m on my second year or fourth planting cycle in my Hatake- it keeps growing in size as I run out of places to plant potatoes :lol:
I’ve been keeping track of my plans and subsequent realities on large graph paper that is growing more crumpled and dirt-stained with each revision. In general I like paper and analogue methods, but I’m wondering if I might be wasting time and effort, rifling through an increasing pile of papers.

Sometimes I feel stress creeping in when trying to balance everything and pay attention to rotation plans- yet I also recognize the need for flexibility- things don’t always go according to plan, someone gifts you a bunch of seedlings, something didn’t come up or got mowed down by slugs... I’ve read through Eliot Coleman’s, JMFortier’s and other more basic methods, and I understand, in theory, but it can be overwhelming.

I’m not a market gardener, but I do have the restaurant to make use of more than what our two-person household could eat. I should add, I love growing (and eating) and often go a bit overboard with what I hope to accomplish :shock:

If anyone has any good methods or applications or just general advice, it would be much appreciated!

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Zasso Nouka
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Hatake/garden planning

Post by Zasso Nouka »

We take a fairly lazy approach to crop rotation. By that I mean we don't grow the same crop in the same space month after month but like with potatoes we are growing in the same space as last year but there has been an intervening crop of something completely different. Next year the tatties will be grown in an entirely different spot.

Things like tomatoes and sweet peppers are grown in the same vinyl houses year after year but between those crops something else completely different is grown. So salad during the winter and tomato/pepper during the summer and in 10 years of growing we haven't had a problem.

I'm not saying crop rotation isn't necessary and important but maybe if you have a thriving soil microbiome and don't grow the same thing month after month you just might be able to get away with a bit more of a lazy approach or it could all go horribly wrong and you lose everything.

As for planning, potatoes are our largest crop in terms of area used so we try and move them around the farm. Once we have decided where they are going it 's then a matter of fitting other crops into the rest of the spaces, we don't use any fancy software or even pen and paper. The areas that were used to grow spuds last year are open for anything this year and next year.

If things don't go strictly according to plan we don't worry too much, so long as you keep an eye out for any problems that might develop and act accordingly then I think you can avoid many problems. If you have a healthy soil biome that can stop a lot of disease causing microbes from getting established I think. I have absolutely no empirical evidence to back this up but so far it seems to have worked for us but if it all suddenly goes horribly wrong I'll know why.

Chuck2
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Hatake/garden planning

Post by Chuck2 »

donguri wrote:
Sat Apr 24, 2021 11:57 am
What method do you use for planning your Hatake space?
How strictly do you follow your plan?
How far in advance do you plan?
How much thought do you put into the particulars of rotation?
1. A few years ago I bought a NHK gardening show book about planning and planting a hatake. It had set plans of what to plant and examples of hatake sizes. It suggested to colour coordinate each rotation crop on your planned design and in the garden ex. laminated colour cards for each little patch of garden. Have an acronym in your case for your 4 crop rotation.

2/3/4. I drew out a plan as in answer 1, started planting. After a few months I abandoned the plan. And now, and ever since I do like Zasso Nouka said, I mainly just try not to plant the same thing in the same place right after.

As for organizing your paper work, what about just taking pictures with your phone of all your old plans, and also continue to write on paper. I'm a big fan of laminating, so I suggest laminating a plan of your garden. Buy some coloured oil pens and then you can draw on this, and even leave it out in the garden. For my grapes, I have metal post for my trellis. I buy what is called paint pen and I write right on the post, I gave this vine a certain compost on this date. Paint pens are great because they will stay written on a post outside for a few years.

donguri
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Hatake/garden planning

Post by donguri »

Thanks guys!
In the end it all seems to work out. I tend to get real excited about growing a wide variety and then buy too many seeds. Then I find myself in a time and space crunch, but it’s still fun when I actually get out in the dirt.
Chuck2 wrote:
Sun Apr 25, 2021 7:54 am
I'm a big fan of laminating, so I suggest laminating a plan of your garden. Buy some coloured oil pens and then you can draw on this, and even leave it out in the garden. For my grapes, I have metal post for my trellis. I buy what is called paint pen and I write right on the post, I gave this vine a certain compost on this date. Paint pens are great because they will stay written on a post outside for a few years.
I dig this idea! It jibes with my desire to document, still uses pens but is more durable and practical. Since I’m still a relative beginner, I’m trying keep note of what I did so I can learn/remember what worked.

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Zasso Nouka
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Hatake/garden planning

Post by Zasso Nouka »

Chuck2 wrote:
Sun Apr 25, 2021 7:54 am
I'm a big fan of laminating, so I suggest laminating a plan of your garden. Buy some coloured oil pens and then you can draw on this, and even leave it out in the garden. For my grapes, I have metal post for my trellis. I buy what is called paint pen and I write right on the post, I gave this vine a certain compost on this date. Paint pens are great because they will stay written on a post outside for a few years.
We got a laminator recently and I'm somewhat embarrassed to admit I've gone a little bit laminator crazy :oops:. They are so good for so many things it's unbelievable, now we have laminated crop calendars and all sorts in my shed and the cafe
donguri wrote:
Sun Apr 25, 2021 6:33 pm
Thanks guys!
In the end it all seems to work out. I tend to get real excited about growing a wide variety and then buy too many seeds.
You aren't the only one :lol:, I still buy way too many seeds for what we can grow but am trying to get it under control
donguri wrote:
Sun Apr 25, 2021 6:33 pm
Then I find myself in a time and space crunch, but it’s still fun when I actually get out in the dirt.
Just store any excess seeds in a fridge in a small ziplock bag with a little pack of silica gel you can get from the 100円 stores and they'll be good for a couple of years.
donguri wrote:
Sun Apr 25, 2021 6:33 pm
I dig this idea! It jibes with my desire to document, still uses pens but is more durable and practical. Since I’m still a relative beginner, I’m trying keep note of what I did so I can learn/remember what worked.
Google sheets is your friend here, we have records going back over the last 10 years which really helps when deciding best time to seed and transplant, always record when a crop failed due to inclement weather. We also record first and last frost dates which is kind of useful when thinking of dates to transplant outside.