Job Hunting

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dayunbao
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Re: Job Hunting

Post by dayunbao » Sat Jun 01, 2019 3:43 am

Zasso Nouka wrote:
Fri May 31, 2019 5:16 am
For some reason or other IT work doesn't seem to be as handsomely remunerated in Japan as elsewhere and the hours many Japanese companies expect their IT workers to do is unreasonable. It might be different working for a foreign company .
That is changing. I've seen companies in Japan paying close to what US software engineers make. In general, most software engineers outside the US earn less than they do in the US, though. For example I spent a lot of time researching software dev jobs in Germany. They pay a lot less than US dev jobs do (like $20,000 USD or more less per year), and if you're unmarried and have no children (like me), you'll be paying 40% income tax. I don't think Japan is that bad, in comparison, if you're smart about the job you take.

Overtime is an issue. All the jobs I've been applying to advertise there's no overtime, but that could be a lie.

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Zasso Nouka
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Re: Job Hunting

Post by Zasso Nouka » Sat Jun 01, 2019 5:00 am

Tax and national health insurance can be quite a burden in the UK as well but then you do get generally free health care should the need arise which is worth it IMHO.

Good to hear that things are beginning to change in Japan as well.

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DocDoesFarming
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Re: Job Hunting

Post by DocDoesFarming » Sat Jun 01, 2019 8:20 am

dayunbao wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 3:43 am
I spent a lot of time researching software dev jobs in Germany. They pay a lot less than US dev jobs do (like $20,000 USD or more less per year), and if you're unmarried and have no children (like me), you'll be paying 40% income tax.
40% for being unmarried??! That is crazy.
What's the reasoning for that? Is that to encourage people to have kids or something?
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dayunbao
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Re: Job Hunting

Post by dayunbao » Sat Jun 01, 2019 9:12 am

Zasso Nouka wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 5:00 am
Tax and national health insurance can be quite a burden in the UK as well but then you do get generally free health care should the need arise which is worth it IMHO.

Good to hear that things are beginning to change in Japan as well.
Yeah, don't get me wrong, I'm actually pro-nationalized health care, as well as supportive of the other social programs countries like the UK and Germany provide (like very cheap to free university). However, part of me thinks that moving to countries like Germany when you're middle-aged (like me) means you're paying into a system you won't really get to reap the benefits of. For example, taking a major pay cut, and paying really high taxes that help fund people to go to university, doesn't make much sense when I just graduated from an American university and am still paying student loans. Recent German grads aren't dealing with tens of thousands of US dollars of student debt. So they can start a career making 2/3 of what I do, and paying crazy high taxes on top of it, and it doesn't affect them the same way. They also grew up receiving health care their parents' taxes paid for, and then they put money back into the pot by paying taxes themselves as adults. I didn't get that "free" healthcare when I was young, but am paying for it as an adult.

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Eric in Japan
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Re: Job Hunting

Post by Eric in Japan » Sat Jun 01, 2019 11:38 am

dayunbao wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 3:43 am
All the jobs I've been applying to advertise there's no overtime, but that could be a lie.
Not could be, is a lie. LOL
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Zasso Nouka
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Re: Job Hunting

Post by Zasso Nouka » Sun Jun 02, 2019 4:16 am

dayunbao wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 9:12 am
However, part of me thinks that moving to countries like Germany when you're middle-aged (like me) means you're paying into a system you won't really get to reap the benefits of.
I guess most tax systems aren't geared towards folk moving between countries, still you would kind of benefit later on from the free health care and possible pension when you get older and if you had kids then they would also benefit but at the end of the day none of us enjoy paying taxes :)

dayunbao
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Re: Job Hunting

Post by dayunbao » Sun Jun 02, 2019 9:11 am

Zasso Nouka wrote:
Sun Jun 02, 2019 4:16 am
dayunbao wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 9:12 am
However, part of me thinks that moving to countries like Germany when you're middle-aged (like me) means you're paying into a system you won't really get to reap the benefits of.
I guess most tax systems aren't geared towards folk moving between countries, still you would kind of benefit later on from the free health care and possible pension when you get older and if you had kids then they would also benefit but at the end of the day none of us enjoy paying taxes :)
True. Once I've paid off my student loans, and depending on what my girlfriend and I decide about where we want to live (if that's someplace other than Japan), I'll definitely consider countries like Germany, Oz, NZ, etc.

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Re: Job Hunting

Post by LeeB » Sun Jun 02, 2019 5:26 pm

"I'll definitely consider countries like Germany, Oz, NZ, etc."

I don't recall, are you Australian?

If not, look at some of the posts I've put up about Australia.

First of all, you'd find that compared to Japan, the cost of living here in Oz is much higher than in Japan.

Electricity, water, natural gas, food, eating out, insurance, and especially housing is very costly. Both rent and buying. Interest rates are much higher for borrowing and the costs of buying such as stamp duty are high too. And if you'd see some of the construction practices that have gone on over the past couple of years in regards to new houses, I'd be very careful of buying one!

Next, the economy here is supposedly 'good', but that really depends on your occupation and age. And don't even think for a second that you'll get what the Australians here call 'a fair go' when looking for work if you are a foreigner or an Australian with foreign experience.The older you are the less likely you'll get a job too.

The economy here is so good that the central bank is going to probably cut rates to 1.25% on Tuesday and the wonks are talking about two more cuts after that this year. Of course, the commercial banks won't pass along the cuts in full to their customers either.

Incomes can be good, if you can get a decent job, but if prices are twice as much as in Japan and your income in Japan is half as much, what is the difference? Taxes here are IMO still high, but much lower than when we first came to Australia.

For example, a simple case of a single person making $72,000 a year in wage income (About 5 million yen at today's exchange rate) or A$6,000 a month would pay about A$15,000 in income tax and Medicare Levy.

If you have kids, you'd probably get some cash from the government. A spouse won't any difference other than you'd have to account for extra living costs as the government here taxes people individually rather than as a couple (As opposed to in Japan with the deductions and offsets.)

Retirement here is great if you have lots of assets or income though.

Then, once you've lived in Japan, you'll never experience the customer service, quality of products, or choice of products that you once did. The Internet here is slower than slow for most of the country and still costs a lot.

Your choice of products is limited and even that seems to be becoming fewer day by day

(For example, I drink leaf tea and when the A$ was much higher I used to buy some good quality tea cheaper from overseas cheaper than the Twinings leaf tea here in the supermarkets and that included the postage too!!

Now that the A$ has sunk like a rock to around 69 cents, that is no longer possible so we buy from an Australian place that is more expensive for the tea, but is cheaper than paying the postage from overseas. So running low the better half tried to buy the stuff only to find that they were out of stock.

No problem, I'll just go to to the supermarket to buy some of that Twinings Earl Grey and mix it half and half until we can order from that other place. Off to the supermarket to do the weekly shopping and buy some tea too.....................

Guess what?

Yep, they no longer stock Earl Grey leaf tea. Nope. Not any brand. Not a leaf of Earl Grey anywhere. Okay, so off to the other nearby big branded supermarket and guess what?

Yep, they don't stock it anymore either!!

We are not talking rocket parts or some really unusual food, but tea. So off to another supermarket down the road.

Finally, they have some in stock.

And don't think that it is limited to tea either. You can go into a supermarket here and find that they don't have any milk in stock. Or they have run out of eggs (supply problems). Dog food too.)

Like Japanese rice? You can buy a brand of rice here called Sun Rice 'Sushi Rice' in 10 kilo bags, but the places that sell it may or may not have it in stock and frankly speaking, the quality and taste just isn't the same as Japanese rice.

So you want to eat Japanese rice? Yes, there are places here in Melbourne now that stock it and sell it to individuals. However, the place we buy from was out of stock for months so it was back to that other rice. Yuck. And by the way, the price is almost the same as in Japan, but depending on the stock levels it can get quite old.........

Lastly, one of my biggest pet peeves about this place is eating out. Too expensive and compared to Japan the quality sucks. It takes forever to find a decent place to eat at that has reasonable prices and consistent quality. The they go out of business or the owner changes and then it time to start all over again.

I really don't want to pay A$40 for steak only to find out that it tastes like crap............

Anyway, if I were you and were thinking of moving to Australia, I'd have a job lined up before moving here and be prepared to pay through the nose for costs of living.

Melbourne is much cheaper than Sydney, but more expensive than Japan. A decent townhouse where I live which is an hour and 10 minutes commute to the CBD will cost you at least 50 million yen. That is if the trains are actually working or a hour commute if the highways aren't clogged or blocked.

And FYI, just another example of living in Melbourne, the world's (worst?) most liveable big city. We got caught in traffic during the afternoon rush at 4:00pm going to fill up the car with gasoline last week. It took 20 minutes to move less than 400 meters and according to the kid, that is normal for that time of the day on that road..................

dayunbao
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Re: Job Hunting

Post by dayunbao » Mon Jun 03, 2019 5:47 am

No, I'm not Australian. Germany, Oz, and NZ are just examples of countries high on my list of developed "Western" countries I'd consider moving to (based on overall quality of life, political stability, climate, state of the industry I work in, etc.).

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Re: Job Hunting

Post by LeeB » Mon Jun 03, 2019 8:37 am

"No, I'm not Australian."

Okay - so then you'll have to go through the visa application process.

I haven't kept up on the details as it no longer affects me.

When we applied for visas it took something like three years or so from start to the time we actually received them. And at that time they based the assessment on the age you were when the visa were granted, not on the age at the time you applied. So if they still have an age based assessment, you'll have to careful as the number of points you get falls away rapidly once you reach a certain age.

Furthermore, at that time they allocated a certain number of visas per area in Japan depending on where you lived. We were 'lucky' (I often wonder about that now!!!) and got the last three for the area. If there had been only two left, we wouldn't have moved.

They also assess your partner for points and English language ability as well as their age.