Buying a house with tanbo questions

A place for properties in the countryside
SetaSurfnTurf
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat May 23, 2020 1:10 pm
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 3 times

Buying a house with tanbo questions

Post by SetaSurfnTurf »

I have bought and sold numerous urban properties in both kanto and kansai so Im not exactly new. But Im now looking at a country place in an area I first lived in some decades ago so I am feeling out of my element.

I found a house that “comes with 2 tanbo”. I will of course be making further inquiries myself but was hoping I could also ask some questions here at simplelife about purchasing a country home.

1. Are tanbo sized like tatami? What I mean is, when my buddy says the house “comes with 2 tanbo” is the size standard?

2. The price of the house and the 2 tanbo is cheap. I think it is par for the course for where I looking. Obviously a check on leans and moneys owed on the property etc need to be looked into, as well as the annual tax for the house and the tanbo combo. What else do I need to be aware of? Are tanbo taxes generally cheap? Expensive?

3. There are other tanbo around the 2 tanbo that come with the house Im looking at. Are there any rules and/or regulations I should be looking out for? For example, changing one of the tanbo to a vegetable patch while keeping the other tanbo active. As owner of the tanbo does one have control over how that land is used? I do understand that Japan farming laws are strict, but do they apply for a situation like this with such a small non-commercial sized tanbo?

4. How much maintenance does a tanbo need? I have planted and harvested my friend’s tanbo before so I understand the work required there. But I don’t know much about the upkeep while it is all growing. The reason why I ask is because this house will be a country home rather than a full time home. So I magine we wont be there some of the time (for example there might be a stretch of 2-3 weeks where we are not there).

Thanks, in advance of any tips/advice. If the trigger gets pulled I will share the experience here.

User avatar
Zasso Nouka
Tech Support
Tech Support
Posts: 3083
Joined: Wed Sep 23, 2015 9:37 am
Location: Chiba Prefecture
Has thanked: 2362 times
Been thanked: 1799 times

Re: Buying a house with tanbo questions

Post by Zasso Nouka »

Welcome to Japan Simple Life SetaSurfnTurf.

Buying registered farm land can be quite a variable experience, it mostly depends on your local municipality. Technically you can't unless you are a registered farmer but if an town/city is keen on attracting newcomers they can make it happen. You will have to speak to the local agricultural department at the shiyakusho and it's probably also worth sounding out the local Nougyo Inkai as they also have a say in land classification, a friendly Nougyo Inkai and helpful agricultural department can go a long way to smoothing things over but in the opposite extreme they could make life very difficult indeed. You could end up owning the land but being forbidden from using it, that happened to one of our members here.


It might be possible for the seller to have the land classified as sanrin. If you really want the house you could probably have the land split off from it so you just buy the house. Taxes are generally pretty cheap on agricultural property.

If you can find a way around the rules and end up buying the house and land as far as I'm aware you can pretty much grow whatever you like there but be aware some areas wouldn't like to see fruit trees or bushes planted in a tanbo yet the neighbouring municipality couldn't give two figs what you grow. Growing annual vegetables is probably the least likely to cause any problems.

As for upkeep and maintenance, you'll need to make it somewhat watertight at the beginning of the growing season. There's an attachment you can get for a tractor that sculpts the edges of the tanbo and polishes the soil to make it watertight. You might be able to get a neighbour to do it for a case of beers if you don't have a tractor or you can buy the plastic ribbed lining if it's quite small. While the rice is growing you'll need to do some occasional weeding but a lot of that can be eliminated with good preparation. After harvesting there isn't really much to do until spring rolls around again.

Don't think there is a standard size for tanbo, at least not where we are.

Shizuman
Posts: 178
Joined: Sat Apr 28, 2018 4:34 pm
Location: Shizuoka
Has thanked: 241 times
Been thanked: 248 times

Re: Buying a house with tanbo questions

Post by Shizuman »

Gday mate

I have a small vegetable farm in tambo right now and in my area there are no standard sizes
two of my fields are about 20 meters by 10 and one is 40 meters by 10 or so it has some weird curves to it.

I am currently applying to the nogyou inkai where i am to become a registered farmer, i am very luck though, here the youngest farmer is 47 and he is the youngest by about 30 years so they really want new blood.
Definitely cozy up to them if you can. As Zasso said the requirements seem to be different, in my area its a matter of size of your farm, i heard in yamanashi its similar.

As for upkeep the guys who neighbor my fields have been awesome helping out with maintenance. Do you have soil sides or are they concrete?

SetaSurfnTurf
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat May 23, 2020 1:10 pm
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 3 times

Re: Buying a house with tanbo questions

Post by SetaSurfnTurf »

Thank you for taking the time to reply. You have given me a good start. I will ask questions to my friends too but having you folks here is very helpful.

The property is not a "must have". I have learned to be patient with these kinds of things. I wouldnt be interested without the tanbo so Im glad they are attached. If this place doesnt pan out there is always a better place just around the corner.

The location is what I consider to be my "furusato". I have many lifelong friends there, so am well connected and familiar with the people and the community - and most importantly I have the support of my friends.

There is a need to get my better half onboard as of now she is on the fence leaning towards a "No" mainly because she thinks the tanbo (either rice of vegetables) will require too much maintenance. For all I know she may be correct, hence I am doing my homework.

Again, thank you for your time. I look forward to researching and sharing in the forum.