Wood Burning Stoves

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Zasso Nouka
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Post by Zasso Nouka »

Sometimes you can get ex display stoves for a substantial discount, we got one for our cafe with 50% off which does make them more affordable.

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Post by Chuck2 »

Zasso Nouka wrote:
Sun Mar 20, 2022 6:22 am
Sometimes you can get ex display stoves for a substantial discount, we got one for our cafe with 50% off which does make them more affordable.
And I think these display stoves are usually on sale around this time of the year (end of March beginning of April.)
Mountain Man wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 10:01 am
Hi all, I’ve just started investigating the possibility of getting a wood-burning stove, but the initial costs seem eye-wateringly expensive - one dealer I checked with said the total price for a ‘reasonable’ cost stove (including chimney and installation) would be around 1.3 million yen.

Is that about how much it usually costs in Japan?? Is it worth shopping around? I know importing from abroad would likely be cheaper but logistically complicated…
We shopped around and found different stove shops were cheaper.
If you go the importing way, make sure you find someone first that will install the piping for you if you're not doing it yourself . The stove shops we talked to would only install their products but might be different from the places your dealing with. Good luck with everything!

We used our stove this season for the first time and was great.
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Post by Mountain Man »

Thanks guys, I think I’m going to ask around and see if I can get any deals on a stove. If not, then I may have to explore the importing route a bit further….

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Post by Savot »

Hi all,

I recently moved into a house in Yuzawa, Niigata and am looking to install a wood-burning stove.

This thread has been a massive help to me in understanding the options, but it's now crunch time and I'm aiming to drop a few yen on a stove in the next couple of weeks or so.

I'd really appreciate some guidance on choosing a suitable stove, and particularly any suggestions for specific stoves. Here's a summary of my situation:

- I'm looking for something 12kW or above as it will be the main heating source for my roughly 200sqm house during the relatively chilly winters here (mean of sub-zero for 2 months).
- Unusually for Japan the house is well insulated (double glazed windows, wall and ceiling insulation etc.).
- I'm planning on using two exhaust fans in the ceiling of the room where the stove will be to transfer heat into other rooms in the house (and using the staircase for cold air return).
- I'll mainly be burning sugi (there are cords and cords of dead trees in the forest out back), but I might also try and source some hardwood for overnight burns.
- I'd like a wood burning (rather than multifuel), non-catalytic stove. Bonus points if the chimney can be connected to the back of the stove.

Some of the stoves that seem to fit my situation are:

- Nectre Mk 1
- Nestor Martin Stanford 12+
- Pleasant Hearth WS-2720

One feature I'm not sure about yet is whether I should get a radiant or convection stove. Any advice on this would be very welcome! I'd also appreciate recommendations for sea freight companies, in case I end up going the import route.

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Post by Zasso Nouka »

I can thoroughly recommend Nestor Martin stoves, the others you list I've never used so can't say anything about them. Our Nestor Martin doesn't warm up as quickly as the Vermont Castings stove but that is actually a bonus as the Vermont Castings stove can warm up too quickly. Also the Nestor Martin goes smokeless the quickest as the internal temperature and airflow contribute to clean burning far quicker than the other stoves we have.

So long as your sugi is well dried a Nestor Martin will have no problem dealing with it, our main wood is sugi and hinoki. We find sugi and hinoki give more heat than hardwoods but you do have to refill more often, however hardwoods are good for an overnight burn if you can source some. If you are using sugi as your main wood then I'd recommend some of the Rutland creosote remover popped in once a week to counter too much tar/creosote building up in your chimney.

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Post by Chuck2 »

Savot wrote:
Mon May 30, 2022 6:40 pm
Hi all,

I recently moved into a house in Yuzawa, Niigata and am looking to install a wood-burning stove.

This thread has been a massive help to me in understanding the options, but it's now crunch time and I'm aiming to drop a few yen on a stove in the next couple of weeks or so.

I'd really appreciate some guidance on choosing a suitable stove, and particularly any suggestions for specific stoves. Here's a summary of my situation:

- I'm looking for something 12kW or above as it will be the main heating source for my roughly 200sqm house during the relatively chilly winters here (mean of sub-zero for 2 months).
- Unusually for Japan the house is well insulated (double glazed windows, wall and ceiling insulation etc.).
- I'm planning on using two exhaust fans in the ceiling of the room where the stove will be to transfer heat into other rooms in the house (and using the staircase for cold air return).
- I'll mainly be burning sugi (there are cords and cords of dead trees in the forest out back), but I might also try and source some hardwood for overnight burns.
- I'd like a wood burning (rather than multifuel), non-catalytic stove. Bonus points if the chimney can be connected to the back of the stove.

Some of the stoves that seem to fit my situation are:

- Nectre Mk 1
- Nestor Martin Stanford 12+
- Pleasant Hearth WS-2720

One feature I'm not sure about yet is whether I should get a radiant or convection stove. Any advice on this would be very welcome! I'd also appreciate recommendations for sea freight companies, in case I end up going the import route.
Those look like some big stoves. We have a radiant stove, I like how quiet it is. Sounds like you have a large area to heat. What are your plus/minus for radiant vs. convection? Convection sounds good to push the air around more but probably higher starting cost and possibly more running/maintenance costs.

One thing I wish my stove had was a side loading door. My understanding is by using the side door you get less smoke coming out during loading.
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Post by Savot »

Thanks Zasso and Chuck!

I like the Nestor Martin, particularly the side door and removable ash pan, but I'm worried that it's a little undersized for the house I'm trying to heat (200sqm). That said, I had the stove guy come by today, and he seemed to think that I'd be right with anything more than 12kW. Interestingly, he said that if I get something too large I'd end up using more wood to maintain the same temperature (I guess that's because more energy is used heating up the larger stove rather than the house?). I'd really appreciate any opinions on whether a 12kW stove can adequately heat a 200sqm two story house?

He also mentioned that there's more variability in heat output when using sugi and that (if I understood correctly) I should get a stove that has (i) fire bricks, (ii) an internal steel firebox and (iii) external cast iron to minimum any damage to the stove. Not sure whether this means I shouldn't consider all steel stoves with cast iron doors and firebricks. I'll definitely be using creosote remover to though!

On convection stove pros and cons, I was thinking that a convection stove might make it easier to warm up the whole house by moving the heat around. On the con side they do seem to be more expensive. The stove guy said either would be fine, and that even a radiant stove should warm the upstairs rooms if I leave the doors open.

I'm leaning towards the Necter Mk1 on the basis that I'm better off having a stove that might be too large than not large enough. I've also found a place in Japan that sells them for the same price as it would cost to import.

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Wood Burning Stoves

Post by VanillaEssence »

I grew up with wood combustion heaters and I cannot imagine that a single one would satisfactorily heat up a space as large as 200m2. I may be wrong about this but I reckon at most one fire is enough for a living/kitchen space. Maybe 100-120m2. This might be enough if you’re also using electric heaters in bedrooms.

I think you’d really be churning through wood to heat such a large area with wood alone.

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Post by Zasso Nouka »

200sqm does sound like a lot for one stove to heat but that also might depend on how much insulation you have. I can only speak about our house, which is a little over 100sqm on the ground floor and our S33 can make it uncomfortably hot sometimes. Sometimes we have to open a window to let some heat out but the house is very well insulated.

Our S33 doesn't have any ceramic plates or fire bricks and so far it seems to have coped with sugi fine but maybe it's about to catastrophically fail suddenly in the next few year :shock: :D but probably not. So long as you have a stove thermometer on the outside of your stove and don't over fire it you should be fine. Once it gets to around 250C you can turn the air flow down or start putting less wood in to maintain that temperature and stop it getting too hot.

Regarding getting a larger stove than you need I think that is a good idea, you don't have to fill it right up with wood all of the time and a larger firebox is better for long overnight burns or if you leave it burning all day with a single load while you are out. What you don't want to do is get one that turns out to be too small to heat your house and come to regret that later on.

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Post by Savot »

To be honest, I've had a lot of difficulty figuring out what the right size stove is for my house. There seems to be a lot of variability between manufactures on the area that a certain number of kW can heat, and even some difference between retailers on the area that the same stove can heat!

I'm pretty sure I'll go with the Nectre Mk 1 now. I'll let you know how it works out next winter (that is, if I don't freeze or cook myself to death :D ).