Firewood

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gonbechan
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Post by gonbechan »

maybe you can make a crow feeding station.
then they might
a. not shit on your car anymore
b. eat the snakes
c. bring you presents.

Just a cup of dry dog food a day will bring loads of gratitude.

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Zasso Nouka
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Post by Zasso Nouka »

gonbechan wrote:
Sat May 01, 2021 10:56 am
c. bring you presents.

Just a cup of dry dog food a day will bring loads of gratitude.
Everyone likes presents :dance:

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Post by Tora »

gonbechan wrote:
Sat May 01, 2021 10:56 am
maybe you can make a crow feeding station.
then they might
a. not shit on your car anymore
b. eat the snakes
c. bring you presents.

Just a cup of dry dog food a day will bring loads of gratitude.
Well, that crow gave up after a week. Apparently they don’t hold grudges as long as my wife :lol:

I may have to try that. I think a crow would be a great pet if they were legal. I guess I’ll have to settle for “special friend” or “ally” if it works.

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Post by DocDoesFarming »

Or Familiar if you want to pretend you're a wizard.
I write a load of bollocks, don't take me seriously.

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Post by Mountain Man »

Does anyone have any recommendations regarding tools or equipment for chopping firewood? Chainsaws or handsaws? Log cutting stands?
I’ve got a big pile of wood that’s that’s only getting bigger, but no stove installed quite yet (hopefully before winter this year), so I’m just at the very beginning of my wood-cutting life. Would like to invest in tools which will serve me well for many years to come.
Any tips much appreciated!

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Post by VanillaEssence »

Stihl chainsaws are very good. I don’t think you will need a handsaw for cutting firewood. Log cutting stand seems unnecessary. If you’re not splitting that much wood I reckon it’s better just to do it by hand. It’s very satisfying just split them on an old log.

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Post by edmundedgar »

We have one of these monsters
photo1650084881.jpeg
photo1650084881.jpeg (45.63 KiB) Viewed 929 times
on semi-permanent loan from our builder's assistant.

It's pretty fun to use, just place the wood on the metal plate thing, push the little lever and it crushes until it breaks into two. The downsides are that it takes up a bit of space (we keep it under cover, I guess it would be OK outside under a blue sheet) and extremely noisy with its little 2-stroke petrol engine.

When they get around to taking it back I'm thinking of getting a smaller one, maybe electric. Ours claims to have 20 tons of crushing power, whereas the electric ones only generally advertise 8, but I guess 8 is probably enough unless you have super-strong mutant trees or something.

The wood is generally ready-chainsawed when we get it in pieces small enough to get in the stove once they're split, one of the tree surgeons near us generally tells us where we can pick it up with our little 1980s 4wd k-truck.

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Post by Tora »

We heat 90-95% with wood and are toasty in a valley that has a reputation for people leaving due to the cold.

I’d say a Chainsaw is a must unless you’ve got something to prove or a bunch of teenagers in need of a real workout. If you’re ready to spend the money, a new stihl, husqharna, shindaiwa, etc would be a treat. Other Japanese brands might be fine too.

I have a Stihl 026 pro (18”bar) and a shindaiwa 350 (14“bar) and the 350 gets the most use unless I need a longer bar. It’s slower but lighter, quieter(?),uses less gas and is a real workhorse. You can often find them used and they’re not too hard to work on if you are able or willing to although they don’t seem to need it. I replaced the gas lines, fuel filter and carb kit on mine after it was given to me. otherwise it’s been trouble free. Read up on Zasso’s tips for using small engines and gas.

An electric/battery chainsaw is much quieter and less vibration but definitely slower and less power. Might be ok if you’re doing things at a slower pace. I use my electric saw for some things when I’m near the house and I don’t want to listen to an angry chainsaw or smoke out the wife and kid. The battery powered chainsaws are tempting but I wonder if the batteries would last long enough for when I’m cutting for a few hours at a time.

I like my Husqvarna splitting axe a lot. Got a big Fiskars maul and splitting wedges for logs that don’t heed the splitting axe. Got a couple old Japanese axes that work pretty good for some kinds of wood. Haven’t figured out how to keep the handles tight on the Japanese axes either.

Recently, I just take the chainsaw to really knotty logs that don’t wanna split- saves a lot of stress and maybe time. Works the saw pretty hard so I let it idle for a while to cool the engine after those workouts. Don’t ask me how I learned that one the hard way….

Lots of ways to approach woodcutting. Depends on how much wood you need and how much time, money, and energy you wanna spend on it too. Also, I think most hardwoods (especially) need to dry/season for 2-5 years before burning. After a couple years of burning well seasoned wood, I’m using some stuff I split 2-3 years ago and it seems a little wet and pretty hard to get started in a cold stove. It Burns fine when the stove is heated up though.

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Post by Zasso Nouka »

Don't really have much to add that's not already been said by everyone else, mainly just to reiterate.

Chainsaws make the job a lot easier if you are cutting up logs, you can quickly whip up a stand from 4x2's if you need one. I made one early on but now cut most stuff up on the ground and hardly ever use the stand I made, just make sure to cut most of the way through and then roll the log over to avoid dulling your chain. If you aren't cutting logs then an electric saw is a good choice.

Axes and mauls are fun but if you are processing a lot then a splitter is a good option. Most electric ones can only operate for around 30 minutes to avoid the oil overheating so aren't good for long splitting sessions, a petrol powered one can go all day without resting.

You can easily make a covered wood store area from scaffold poles and totan sheeting if you don't already have somewhere dry to store the wood. Plastic pallets or bamboo poles work well to keep the wood off the ground.

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Post by Chuck2 »

Here are my recommendations:

1. If you have a Stihl chainsaw get one of Stihls 2 in1 chain sharpener. I got one this year and it was awesome because it was fast and most importantly give me sharp chain after every use and easy to use.

2. Fiskar splitting axe is a great bang for your buck.

3. We got one of those kindlingcrackers for the kids to use. Turns out they are super fast and easy to use for daddy too. I used my new hatcht once and now make all my kindling with this kindling cracker.

4. I made one of these splitting blocks like in this video. It was nice not having to bend over every time to pick up all your split wood.
https://youtu.be/138532JYNWI
"We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children."