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Linden
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Post by Linden »

Hi! I'm Linden, I currently live in a sleeper town west of Nagoya but I hope to move to somewhere with more mountains and less factories.

I'm a disabled house-husband and spend most of my free time helping my elderly neighbors with their vegetable patch. I do all the weeding, composting, and soil management in exchange for about 12 tsubo of space and enough fruit off their trees to make jelly. Currently in addition to the regular summer vegetables I'm doing an experiment with companion-planting giant sunflowers and tomatoes.

I got big into permaculture in high school and had a 4-acre garden and some chickens at my parents' house in Massachusetts. Always assumed I'd inherit it and take care of it until I died, but they washed their hands of me so I've got to find a new patch of dirt to attach myself to. I've also lived in Florida, so I have a nostalgic soft spot for yashinoki and citrus trees, and half my life in New York City.

My hobbies mostly revolve around making things nice again, whether the thing is environments or artifacts, so I'm itching to get my hands on a run-down kominka. Someday I hope to have enough social connections to get into hunting or fishing, or to find someone who can teach me how to forage in this biome.

Happy to have found a like-minded community :)

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Zasso Nouka
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Post by Zasso Nouka »

Hi Linden and welcome to the forum, great to have you onboard and thank you very much for taking the time to join our little community.

Helping out your elderly neighbours sounds like a great way to learn a lot of the growing wisdom they've picked up over the years. I know I've learned a huge amount from our older neighbours about ways to deal with insects or natural ways to feed the soil like making biochar from rice husks or bamboo. It's also a great way to integrate into your community.

Your elderly neighbours are probably a good lead on foraging in your area as they likely have all that necessary local knowledge for what's in season or to be found throughout the year.

Hunting is a skill that sadly less and less folk are taking up, the hunters in our village have given up now due to age and we are getting more problems with wild boar and no longer get given chunks of meat from their hunting expeditions. Although some people are now starting to install traps, a couple of weeks ago they caught a large boar and had to call the local policeman to shoot it as the thing was really feisty and very pissed off about being caught in the trap.

Anyway thank you for joining Japan Simple Life and look forward to chatting with you on the forum.

Linden
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Post by Linden »

Helping out your elderly neighbours sounds like a great way to learn a lot of the growing wisdom they've picked up over the years.
Alas, there has been a generational loss of knowledge. These are all people who had urban lives and careers and happen to have inherited rural property in retirement, with an obligation to use the farmland. They didn't know about composting, they fertilizer-burned their persimmons, they killed all the beneficial insects and then couldn't figure out why their citrus was always covered in scale. It's funny, they could remember having seen hot compost piles steaming in the rain as children, but they didn't know what they were for.
But, importantly, I did acquire some JA-relevant political wisdom! And now I have a portfolio to show a future 農業委員会 when I move!