Tactics & ideas for dealing with extreme weather

Finding land, working a small plot or anything else countryside related
Tora
Posts: 485
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 8:53 am
Has thanked: 279 times
Been thanked: 839 times

Tactics & ideas for dealing with extreme weather

Post by Tora »

Zasso Nouka wrote:
Fri Aug 11, 2023 6:47 am
Right now we'd be prepared to take some heavy winds if it meant several days of rain.

We'll have to look into installing drip lines across most of our land for next year I think. Expensive but can't afford to lose crops to a lack of rain again.
I’ve been worried about the effects of this lack of rain on farmers like yourself. The 600l worth of rain barrels I installed last year helped us through the last couple of weeks. My irrigation system involves moving the hose every 30-60 seconds or hauling buckets and tanks of water around so it’s not ideal and impractical on a larger scale.

I seem to recall a month or more of very hot dry weather last summer (and the year before that?) so maybe irrigation will be essential for the future of summer vegetable farming here.

User avatar
Zasso Nouka
Tech Support
Tech Support
Posts: 5657
Joined: Wed Sep 23, 2015 9:37 am
Location: Chiba Prefecture
Has thanked: 4131 times
Been thanked: 3550 times

Incoming Typhoons for 2023 (ugh)

Post by Zasso Nouka »

Most of the bigger farms around us use spray type hoses or rotary sprinklers which cover a whole field but we prefer drip lines irrigation as it uses far less water but is more expensive to set up. It also has the advantage of not encouraging leaf infections from bacteria and fungi.

Up until now our extensive use of momigara as a mulch has enabled our veggies to get through any dry periods without needing supplementary watering but this year has been exceptionally dry. It's too early to say if this is a new normal but it's probably a good idea to have the kit on hand in case it is.

Hope this typhoon brings you some good surfing ;)

Tora
Posts: 485
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 8:53 am
Has thanked: 279 times
Been thanked: 839 times

Incoming Typhoons for 2023 (ugh)

Post by Tora »

Zasso Nouka wrote:
Sat Aug 12, 2023 6:31 am
Most of the bigger farms around us use spray type hoses or rotary sprinklers which cover a whole field but we prefer drip lines irrigation as it uses far less water but is more expensive to set up. It also has the advantage of not encouraging leaf infections from bacteria and fungi.

Up until now our extensive use of momigara as a mulch has enabled our veggies to get through any dry periods without needing supplementary watering but this year has been exceptionally dry. It's too early to say if this is a new normal but it's probably a good idea to have the kit on hand in case it is.

Hope this typhoon brings you some good surfing ;)
Drip and underground irrigation systems seem to be the most efficient use of water.

Momigara and leaf mulch has really helped with weed and moisture control. I’m thankful I learned that here!

These typhoons haven’t been so good for surf here. This next one looks like it might nail us too! :shock: Hopefully you’ll still get some rain.

Tora
Posts: 485
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 8:53 am
Has thanked: 279 times
Been thanked: 839 times

Incoming Typhoons for 2023 (ugh)

Post by Tora »

Tora wrote:
Wed Aug 16, 2023 10:38 am
The Avon’s are a little thick, though.
That should read, “the SKINS are a little thick”

Is Avon still a thing?! Why does it come up in autocorrect?!!!

User avatar
Zasso Nouka
Tech Support
Tech Support
Posts: 5657
Joined: Wed Sep 23, 2015 9:37 am
Location: Chiba Prefecture
Has thanked: 4131 times
Been thanked: 3550 times

Incoming Typhoons for 2023 (ugh)

Post by Zasso Nouka »

Can't remember which YouTube channel I saw it on but transplanting into deep holes (30 ~ 40cm) was supposed to benefit plants by having soil that wouldn't dry out and also access to minerals that could be depleted on the surface.

We've never had our soil analysed but it sounded reasonable so we now put all transplants into deep holes along with a good sprinkling of crushed oyster shells for minerals.

Tora
Posts: 485
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 8:53 am
Has thanked: 279 times
Been thanked: 839 times

Incoming Typhoons for 2023 (ugh)

Post by Tora »

Zasso Nouka wrote:
Thu Aug 17, 2023 7:32 am
Can't remember which YouTube channel I saw it on but transplanting into deep holes (30 ~ 40cm) was supposed to benefit plants by having soil that wouldn't dry out and also access to minerals that could be depleted on the surface.

We've never had our soil analysed but it sounded reasonable so we now put all transplants into deep holes along with a good sprinkling of crushed oyster shells for minerals.
Can I ask what you are planting so deeply? Just tomatoes?

The deep planting makes sense. I will probably try that this fall.

I need to pick up some more oyster shells. I keep forgetting to take a bucket for shells when I go to the beach. Firing them
is a pretty hot job in the summer anyway. Buying them is definitely worth it unless you have really good reasons to DIY.

User avatar
Zasso Nouka
Tech Support
Tech Support
Posts: 5657
Joined: Wed Sep 23, 2015 9:37 am
Location: Chiba Prefecture
Has thanked: 4131 times
Been thanked: 3550 times

Incoming Typhoons for 2023 (ugh)

Post by Zasso Nouka »

Shall I split the part about deep planting into it's own thread ? Might make it a bit easier for anyone looking for info in the future.
Tora wrote:
Thu Aug 17, 2023 9:22 pm

Can I ask what you are planting so deeply? Just tomatoes?

The deep planting makes sense. I will probably try that this fall.
We use this for Nasu, pepper/chilli, okra and some kabocha/zucchini, basically anything that can send roots out from the stem when in contact with soil or can tolerate having the soil in contact with the stem without rotting. Here is a couple of pictures of our autumn nasu that were planted out this week and them mulched with around 15 ~ 20cm of momigara.

Image

Image

We don't do it for cucumbers as they need lots of water from drip lines so better to have their roots near the surface.
Tora wrote:
Thu Aug 17, 2023 9:22 pm
I need to pick up some more oyster shells. I keep forgetting to take a bucket for shells when I go to the beach. Firing them
is a pretty hot job in the summer anyway. Buying them is definitely worth it unless you have really good reasons to DIY.
This sack is around 800円 for 20kg

Image

Tora
Posts: 485
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 8:53 am
Has thanked: 279 times
Been thanked: 839 times

Incoming Typhoons for 2023 (ugh)

Post by Tora »

Zasso Nouka wrote:
Fri Aug 18, 2023 2:53 pm
Shall I split the part about deep planting into it's own thread ? Might make it a bit easier for anyone looking for info in the future.
Putting the Deep Planting info in a separate thread is a good idea. I’d been thinking the same thing.

I’d also been wondering if a thread on ways for farmers/gardeners to work with/around the recent summer weather- if the last few could be considered a pattern. I know you’ve mentioned a few things regarding planting, mulching, irrigating, etc. which I’m sure have been noticed by observant current members but it might be a lot to sort through for future members or those of us with increasing incidences of age-induced memory issues. If you want to keep the hurdle high for the people who are really hungry for that info, that’s fair too. People often don’t appreciate the true value of easy information.

I’ve had a lot of problems with more plants falling/blowing over this year than in the past so, I will definitely try the deep planting in the future. I’ll thank you. I need to make a list of plants that works with.

15cm is a lot of momigara! I’ll talk to the neighbors and get a few more truckloads than I did last year. The relatively small amount I used this year seemed to really help. All the momigara does make it more difficult to do the kind of supplementary feeding I’ve had success with over the years. I probably need to learn new methods and do more to improve the soil so those supplementary feedings aren’t so necessary.

Btw, how long do you find it takes for the momigara to decompose? A local strawberry farm I get on well with said 5 years but I didn’t think to ask if that was beginning to decompose or completely decomposed. I do understand that soil and other environmental factors are involved in that decomposition.

The oyster shells seem to have gone up ¥150-200 since I bought them last year. Sigh….

User avatar
Zasso Nouka
Tech Support
Tech Support
Posts: 5657
Joined: Wed Sep 23, 2015 9:37 am
Location: Chiba Prefecture
Has thanked: 4131 times
Been thanked: 3550 times

Tactics & ideas for dealing with extreme weather

Post by Zasso Nouka »

Tora wrote:
Sat Aug 19, 2023 10:02 pm
Putting the Deep Planting info in a separate thread is a good idea. I’d been thinking the same thing.

I’d also been wondering if a thread on ways for farmers/gardeners to work with/around the recent summer weather- if the last few could be considered a pattern. I know you’ve mentioned a few things regarding planting, mulching, irrigating, etc. which I’m sure have been noticed by observant current members but it might be a lot to sort through for future members or those of us with increasing incidences of age-induced memory issues. If you want to keep the hurdle high for the people who are really hungry for that info, that’s fair too. People often don’t appreciate the true value of easy information.
Getting old really sucks, I'm trying positive affirmation to convince my body its not really approaching 60 but rather mid 30's, however it doesn't seem to be working 😭😅.

We could either do separate threads or put the deep planting info into a coping with extreme weather thread. Either one would work well, let me know which one you prefer or just start a thread/s and I can move the posts over.
Tora wrote:
Sat Aug 19, 2023 10:02 pm
I’ve had a lot of problems with more plants falling/blowing over this year than in the past so, I will definitely try the deep planting in the future. I’ll thank you. I need to make a list of plants that works with.
A couple of years back we bought a load of supports for the garden and then a typhoon came along, snapped them off and flung the pieces all over the place. So now our plants have to stand up for themselves or develop a more horizontal lifestyle 😅.

Perhaps as a rough rule of thumb, anything susceptible to stem rotting probably won't benefit from deep planting.



Tora wrote:
Sat Aug 19, 2023 10:02 pm
15cm is a lot of momigara! I’ll talk to the neighbors and get a few more truckloads than I did last year. The relatively small amount I used this year seemed to really help. All the momigara does make it more difficult to do the kind of supplementary feeding I’ve had success with over the years. I probably need to learn new methods and do more to improve the soil so those supplementary feedings aren’t so necessary.

Btw, how long do you find it takes for the momigara to decompose? A local strawberry farm I get on well with said 5 years but I didn’t think to ask if that was beginning to decompose or completely decomposed. I do understand that soil and other environmental factors are involved in that decomposition.

The oyster shells seem to have gone up ¥150-200 since I bought them last year. Sigh….
That's more of an experiment to see if a deeper layer of momigara makes any difference, 5 ~ 10cm is more usual. Hard to say how long it lasts as we either top it up every year or rake it off into the pathway if direct seeding a bed covered in momigara but 3 ~ 5 years sounds reasonable. Nitrogen fertiliser will get washed through momigara easily enough by rain but phosphorous can be a little insoluble and might take quite a while to reach the soil if it's in solid form, potassium will be somewhere in between. Might be a bit of a hassle sweeping the momigara aside to add fertiliser I guess, depends how often you have to do it or what form your fertiliser is in.

If you don't mind me asking, you have kiln for your glass work don't you. How on earth do you cope with the heat from that in the summer ? Must be somewhat dangerous working with it at this time of the year.

Tora
Posts: 485
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 8:53 am
Has thanked: 279 times
Been thanked: 839 times

Tactics & ideas for dealing with extreme weather

Post by Tora »

Zasso Nouka wrote:
Sun Aug 20, 2023 4:25 pm
We could either do separate threads or put the deep planting info into a coping with extreme weather thread. Either one would work well, let me know which one you prefer or just start a thread/s and I can move the posts over.
One thread seems like it would fit both topics well.

I can’t seem to think of a good title for a thread at present. So, whoever thinks of a good title first?
Zasso Nouka wrote:
Sun Aug 20, 2023 4:25 pm
So now our plants have to stand up for themselves or develop a more horizontal lifestyle 😅.

Perhaps as a rough rule of thumb, anything susceptible to stem rotting probably won't benefit from deep planting.
Horizontal gardening kinda describes my default gardening style from the look of things.

The vulnerability to stem rot as a rule of thumb makes sense. Thank you.
Zasso Nouka wrote:
Sun Aug 20, 2023 4:25 pm

If you don't mind me asking, you have kiln for your glass work don't you. How on earth do you cope with the heat from that in the summer ? Must be somewhat dangerous working with it at this time of the year.
Glass blowing (soft/soda glass vs boro) usually involves 3 furnaces. One for melting and holding the glass is kept at 1150-1350 degrees and stays on all the time. One for reheating the glass is kept at 1400 degrees and is basically on while working- this is the one I spend the most time near. One furnace, kept at 480 degrees or so is for slowly cooling the glass overnight or over a few days, depending on what you’re making.

It’s unmercifully hot in most glass studios now. It’s usually worst when the humidity is high so this year has been terrible.

Drinking lots of water, eating lots of salt, and not thinking about the heat are all essential. Especially, the part about not thinking about the heat, or oncoming dehydration or heatstroke seem to be important cuz then I make mistakes and that piece is lost or it ends up taking much longer to fix… and these things are often the last straw.

The studio I usually rent to make my work is crazy hot (the thermometer they used to have melted from the radiant furnace heat 2.5 meters away!) and I’m really glad it’s closed down for maintenance for the next month and a half. Maybe this will be a new rhythm? It is certainly not worth the suffering unless I’m making something really worth while at this time of year.