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VanillaEssence

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Post by VanillaEssence »

Zasso Nouka wrote:
Sat Nov 18, 2023 1:38 pm
I'm sure our village is no exception but it seems barmy to me that so many countryside households duplicate all the rice farming machinery rather than clubbing together. So each house has a tractor, a rice planter, a combine, a dryer, a miller plus all the other ancillary equipment, all that needs maintaining and servicing.

Having said that we buy our rice from our neighbour even if it is somewhat more expensive because it's about supporting the local economy for us. However like you I can't tell the difference between different varieties of rice much or the same varieties grown in different locations but lets just keep that between ourselves :shhh:
Haha, and it seems like the local cooperatives should be the ideal platform for doing this, don't you think? Trouble is they've spent too long trying to protect high prices and the history of the government guaranteeing the price means they've evolved with perverse incentives. Hope they change

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Post by Zasso Nouka »

You'd think so but instead of promoting their individual qualities many seem to have grown lazy on those sweet sweet government subsidies. Talking of which, we've seen so many new farmers start up with the five year subsidy and then once that runs out they find themselves ill equipped to farm properly and give up. Not everyone and the smarter ones use it wisely to get going but a sizeable number don't work out their costs during the first five years because they don't need to with the subsidy.

We never took the subsidy so from day one had to be profitable and when I see someone starting out without a subsidy I think they are more likely to keep going. Now I'm not criticising any one that uses them and they can be very useful but there is always a danger they can make someone lazy and not think about what happens when it runs out.

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Post by Logman »

Zasso Nouka wrote:
Sat Nov 18, 2023 1:38 pm
I'm sure our village is no exception but it seems barmy to me that so many countryside households duplicate all the rice farming machinery rather than clubbing together. So each house has a tractor, a rice planter, a combine, a dryer, a miller plus all the other ancillary equipment, all that needs maintaining and servicing.

Having said that we buy our rice from our neighbour even if it is somewhat more expensive because it's about supporting the local economy for us. However like you I can't tell the difference between different varieties of rice much or the same varieties grown in different locations but lets just keep that between ourselves :shhh:
Interested to hear how much you pay for the standard 30kg sack of husked rice. We sell for 6000 yen and it's kakeine so no artificial drying and supposed to taste better. If you polish it to white rice you get about 18kg so works out to about 1800 yen for 5kg which is comparable to store bought rice.

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Post by Zasso Nouka »

I think we pay around 7,000 ~ 8,000円 for a 30kg sack which is a tad high but that seems to be the going rate in our area.

Price fluctuates from year to year depending on conditions. This year kuzu mai (sp ?) Doubled in Price to 98円 a kilo but kuzu mugi dropped by half to 40円 a kilo so swings and roundabouts for chicken feed.

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Post by tataminodani »

Welcome to the OP :clap: , but off topic where would I find more info about these farming subsidies? :think:

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Post by VanillaEssence »

tataminodani wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2023 3:04 pm
Welcome to the OP :clap: , but off topic where would I find more info about these farming subsidies? :think:
This appears to be a pretty solid run down of everything, and has relevant links to the MAFF website.

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Post by Zasso Nouka »

tataminodani wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2023 3:04 pm
Welcome to the OP :clap: , but off topic where would I find more info about these farming subsidies? :think:
The agricultural department in your local council would be a good place to start, they can tell you about various local, prefectural and national subsidies available.

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Post by tataminodani »

Thank you both. Now back to our regularly scheduled programming.

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Post by czaujapman »

Benny Shoga wrote:
Wed Nov 15, 2023 11:48 am
What are some other avenues one could make a modest living while living in rural Japan?
Welcome to the forums! Why not buy a business - plenty of empty hotels, hostels, motels maybe a campground which has gotten really popular? According to this guy I've been watching on utube lately - average age of Japanese business owner is 62yo and some are willing to even give the business away for free if you're happy to learn and take over... So many opportunities - BUT first you have to move here and suss it out
Disclaimer: I do not run my business like many others here, just offering an opinion :D
https://www.youtube.com/@shumatsuopost/featured

Good luck!
“My technique is don’t believe anything. If you believe in something, you are automatically precluded from believing its opposite.” ― Terence McKenna